Thanksgiving Leftover Sandwich | www.acozykitchen.com

For me the day after Thanksgiving is about celebrating leftovers. While some people decide to spend the day trampling each other for a discounted flat screen, I like to hang out in my pajamas and build the most important sandwich of the year.

You’ve made a version of sandwich before. But this year I’m making it a lil’ bit more special by teaming up with my favorite condiments brand, Sir Kensington’s. Their ketchups are flavorful and fresh tasting, without being overly sweet. Their mayonnaises are rich and smooth, taste homemade and use all-natural ingredients—very good stuff!

By mixing their delish mayonnaise with a few spoonfuls of cranberry sauce, you instantly have a beautifully-hued cranberry mayonnaise. It’s sweet and decadent and perfect for dry-ass turkey.

Thanksgiving Leftover Sandwich | www.acozykitchen.com

I also advise putting a bit of gravy on the turkey. That helps too. And you’ll need stuffing and some creamy mashed potatoes if you’re feeling crazy.

I like to use Japanese bread that I pick up from Little Tokyo. It’s perfectly square, almost like good pullman, it’s a little eggy and super soft. I luv it. Of course, brioche or even good wheat bread would also work gloriously.

There’s also a bit of microgreens dressed in olive oil and a pinch of salt for some added freshness. If you had green beans or any sort of leftover salad from the table, get creative and add those.

Thanksgiving Leftover Sandwich | www.acozykitchen.com

And since I’m always feeling a little crazy and sad that Thanksgiving is over, I like to build the sandwich higher than I normally would make a sandwich, which means three layers are an absolute must.

I had a bit of leftover cranberry mayonnaise and used it the next day as a dipping sauce for French fries and it was AMAZING. Tart and rich might be my favorite combination ever.

You can pick up Sir Kensington’s at your local Whole Foods. And since the jars are attractive, I also think these jars would be good gifts. I mean, if someone showed up to my holiday party and gave me a jar of Sir Kensington mayonnaise as a hostess gift, I’d know that person understands me as a human.

Thanksgiving Leftover Sandwich | www.acozykitchen.com

Thanksgiving Leftover Sandwich with Sir Kensington's

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Total Time: 10 minutes

Yield: 1 Thanksgiving sandwich

Serving Size: 1

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup Sir Kensington's mayonnaise
  • 2 teaspoons cranberry sauce
  • 2 slices of good bread, such as pullman, brioche or soft wheat bread
  • Handful of micro greens
  • 1 teaspoon of olive oil
  • Salt 
  • Drizzle of gravy
  • Spoonful of stuffing
  • Spoonful of mashed potatoes

Directions

  1. In a small bowl, mix together mayonnaise and cranberry sauce. Lightly toast the bread if you like. Next, slather three slices of bread with the cranberry mayonnaise. Set aside. 
  2. To a small bowl, mix together the micro greens with the olive oil and a pinch of salt. On a small plate heat up the turkey, if you like, I kinda like it cold. Drizzle on warm gravy. 
  3. To build the sandwich, add the stuffing, turkey, mashed potatoes and micro greens. Build it high! Add more cranberry mayonnaise, if you like. 
http://acozykitchen.com/thanksgiving-leftover-sandwich/

(This post is sponsored by Sir Kensington’s. Thanks for supporting the sponsors that keep A Cozy Kitchen cozy.)
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Pie Crust 101 // www.acozykitchen.com

PIE PIE PIE! If you know me and you read this blog, you know that I’m a pie girl, through and through.

And let’s be honest, pie and mashed potatoes are the most important thing about Thanksgiving. Do not let anyone tell you otherwise.

I wanted to a do a lil’ round-up of some pies that I’ve posted over the years to get you in the pie-making mood.

Pie Crust 101. Dudes, it’s not that hard. There’s a step-by-step thingy I did last year. If you’ve never made a pie before, it takes a little courage to give it a go, but really it ain’t no thang.

Thanksgiving Pie Situation | www.acozykitchen.com

1. Rose Apple Pie with Bourbon Glaze – Thinly sliced apples, arranged in a slightly psychotic way so the whole pie looks like a rose. A bourbon glaze is brushed on top. Just dreamy.

2. Brûléed Classic Pumpkin Pie – Shards of burnt sugar make this pumpkin pie super exciting.

3. Classic Apple Pie – This is the pie I’ll be making this year. It’s everything you want from an apple pie.

4. Salted Caramel Apple Pie with a Heart Crust – Cuteness central! The heart crust is my favorite.

5. Caramel Pear Pie with Oat Crumble – Crumble meets pie in this pear pie. Oh yeh and there’s caramel up in this too.

6. Walnut and Angostura Pie – Pecan pie gets a crazy update. There’s walnuts, angostura bitters and no corn syrup. Brown rice syrup only!

7. Peanut Butter Cream Pie – If you’re not feeling fruit pies or pumpkin pie, NBD. There’s this creamy, decadent peanut butter dream pie.

8. Braided Bourbon Pumpkin Pie – Bourbon makes anything better. Truth.

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Sticky Salty Toffee Persimmon Pudding | www.acozykitchen.com

Thanksgiving is all about pie. But if you can believe it, there are people out in the world that dislike pie. I know many of them; they’re prefer cake or cookies or ice cream.  While part of me would like to talk all sorts of trash on them, I sort of get it.

I used to dislike fruit pies and would skip the fruit part all together and just dip the crust in whipped cream. That was before I learned that there are apples in the world that should be baked and others that should never ever be touched with heat. This made the world of difference.

Because these people who hate pie exist, I wanted to give you an alternative. This persimmon pudding is like a spongy cake with hot salty and sticky toffee sauce poured on top. It’s warm and soft and salty and sweet and ahhh! I made this a couple times and each time I was like, This might be better than apple pie!

Sticky Salty Toffee Persimmon Pudding | www.acozykitchen.com [click to continue…]

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Walnut and Angostura | www.acozykitchen.com

Are you a corn syrup hater? You probably are. Everyone is and I get it. I do.

Since I use it so sparingly, I’m not that weird about it. There are some instances when it offers results that are pitch perfect. Examples: Fudge sauce (the sheen that corn syrup provides is dreamy) and marshmallows (man, oh man, it’s just a must).

I do hate corn syrup in ice cream. Oh good gracious. I can actually taste the acid in the corn syrup in the back of my throat. It’s awful. A lot of ice cream makers have started to include corn syrup because it provides such a glorious and smooth texture to ice cream. I get it. I do.

But there are other instances where corn syrup can easily be swapped out and I take those opportunities any chance I get. Namely, pecan pie. And in this case, walnut pie…with bitters because YAAASSSS!

Walnut and Angostura | www.acozykitchen.com [click to continue…]

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Pan Dripping Gravy | www.acozykitchen.com

Gravy is my everything. While I love it on everything from stuffing to slices of turkey to mashed potatoes, I REALLY love it the day after Thanksgiving. You know, when things have dried up a bit and really need that dreaded word we all hate: moisture. Cranberry sauce helps too and so does mayonnaise, which is actually foreshadowing as to what’s to come next week, but for now, GRAVY!

This gravy is thick and smooth and delicious. It starts by using the drippings from yesterday’s turkey. And I’ll say that the drippings from that turkey and its dry brine are VERY salty drippings. But I added a few things to combat that saltiness so no need to not get on this lil’ gravy train (do you see what I did there?).

Isn’t Thanksgiving the best? Even planning Thanksgiving excites me so very much.

Recipe and the rest of the post is on PBS Food.

Pan Dripping Gravy | www.acozykitchen.com [click to continue…]

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Citrus Dry-Brined Turkey | www.acozykitchen.com

For years and years and years, I dunked a raw bird in a wet brine and called it a day. Last year Josh spiced the brine with persimmons and quince and fall stuff like all-spice and cloves. I loved it. But, I also was curious if this was really even needed. I mean, it was kind of a pain. There was a trash bag involved and there’s something inherently weird about putting food you’re going to eat into a garbage bag, even if it’s clean.

So, I did some research. And turns out a lot of people we’re a million light years ahead of me with their hatred toward the wet brine. And some of the science behind why dry brines are best, made complete sense to me. (Serious Eats’ experimentation is super awesome.)

Citrus Dry-Brined Turkey | www.acozykitchen.com

I decided to give the dry-brine a go this year and I’m so glad I did. This year it’s all ’bout the dry brine. Says who? Just me.

The brine I made consisted of salt, ground coriander, minced herbs like sage, rosemary and thyme, and zest from a lemon and orange. It’s really actually quite simple. The bird is rubbed with it the day before and the entire bird dry-brines for a good 24 hours.

Citrus Dry-Brined Turkey | www.acozykitchen.com

There’s nothing fancy or weird or particularly unusual about this. I mean, it kinda reminds of how I like to roast a chicken. This recipe yielded the crispiest skin I’ve ever had on a turkey, which in my book immediately makes it a complete keeper. I would be completely content if someone served me crispy turkey skin ONLY. Of course, that’d be insane and v Paula Deen of me; not a cute look for me.

For the whole recipe and more pictures and a longer tirade about my love for this recipe and turkey, go to PBS Food!

#COZYTHANKSGIVING

Citrus Dry-Brined Turkey | www.acozykitchen.com
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Twice-Baked Acorn Squash topped w/Maple Butter and Pecans | www.acozykitchen.com

Twice-baked potatoes are kinda basic, aren’t they? They are in an endearing way, of course. They’re simple and adorable and I kinda have the urge to pat them on the head and tell them they’re cute. But for this Thanksgiving, I wanted a side dish with a bit of class, so I decided that old favorite of ours needed a bit of a makeover.

This is its classier bigger sister; less cheese, less carbs yet still indulgent and delicious. Also, this is definitely the first time where I’m saying less cheese/less carbs and meaning it as a good thing.

Twice-Baked Acorn Squash topped w/Maple Butter and Pecans | www.acozykitchen.com [click to continue…]

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Brighter_1

The big T-Day is next Thursday and if you’re the organized cute person I know you are, you’re probably in big time planning mode. This week is Thanksgiving week on this lil’ blog. There will be sides. There will be a big bird. And of course, PIE will make an appearance!

To kick things off, we’re starting with the most important cooking aide: wine. Cooking is so much better, albeit a little more dangerous, when there’s a glass of wine in everyone’s hands. Wine has the ability to iron out all of the inevitable Thanksgiving woes like fun family tension, messing up the pie crust and maybe making the bird a bit too toasty.

Today I teamed up with my friend, sommelier, and Bottle Stock owner, Whitney Adams. She’s recommending three Thanksgiving wines that are all under $20.

I know most of you aren’t in Los Angeles, so I’m approaching this a few different ways. Two of these wines are available via Domaine LA and they can be shipped to you. If you’re in LA, you can obviously just stop in and pick them up.

We’re also providing tasting notes for each of these wines. The idea behind this is that you can go into your local wine shop and request a wine that tastes similarly.

So, for instance, with the wine just below, you can drop into a wine shop and say you’re looking for an orange wine that’s bright, a little chewy, and under $20-$25. And lastly, if the wine shop doesn’t have an orange wine, there are other alternatives listed that might be a good replacement.

Three Thanksgiving Wines | www.acozykitchen.com

2013 Folk Machine Jeanne d’Arc – (Chenin Blanc from California) Skin contact white wine, or “orange” wine, is so versatile with food because of its savory edge. A little chewy, golden and delicious.

Alternatives: Sherry, Chardonnay or Savagnin from the Jura, Bottle fermented beers, Cider.

Pictured with Bottle Stock Tie-Dye Leather Cocktail Napkins, Corkscrew in Gold Burst and Bodega Tumblers.

Three Thanksgiving Wines | www.acozykitchen.com

Three Thanksgiving Wines | www.acozykitchen.com

2013 Un Saumon Dans la Loire ‘La Boutanche’ Gamay – (Gamay from Loire, France) It comes in a full liter so it’s already winning. Light with cranberry tartness and a touch of funk and herbaceousness.

Alternatives: Frappato, Pinot Noir, Beaujolais, Loire Cabernet Franc.

Pictured with Tie-Dye Leather Coasters in Light Blue/Dark Blue, Corkscrew in Sweet Tart and stemless wine glasses.

Three Thanksgiving Wines | www.acozykitchen.com

Thanksgiving_7

NV Provenza Spumante Rosato ‘Turbian’ – (Gropello and Marzemino blend from Lombardy, Italy) Fruity but bone dry, refreshing and gulp-able. And a perfect example of why you shouldn’t buy wine based on how the bottle looks : \

Alternatives: Lambrusco, dry Italian or French rosé, Txakolina, Pink Petillant Naturel

Pictured with Tie-Dye Leather Coasters in Slate and Putty and Duralex (4-ounce) Tumblers.

Three Thanksgiving Wines | www.acozykitchen.com

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Fall Dinner Party | www.acozykitchen.com

It’s not every weekend when I get the opportunity to gather my friends together and host a dinner party, so when I was invited to be a part of the #BertolliGoldLabel Italian Progressive Dinner Party, I said a-ok!

I’m a pretty casual person; this means I like my dinner parties to feel very fuss-free. Here are some guidelines I like to follow:

1. I kinda start to stress out when I see the host get up a million times. I feel like I should help! I don’t want my friends to feel like this so I make sure everything is ready (entree included), on the table, served family-style. This means from the time they arrive everything is very laid back.

2. At least one course is completely store-bought. In this case it was the sauce from Bertolli (more on that later), cheeses, charcuterie, figs and grapes and olives. Easy breezy!

mported Balsamic Vinegar of Modena, Italy paired with Caraemlized Onions a

3. Wine matches the food. My friend Whitney helped with this, selecting the perfect, super affordable Italian wines to go with our Italian-inspired dinner.

Fall Dinner Party | www.acozykitchen.com [click to continue…]

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Picadillo

in Dinner

Picadillo | www.acozykitchen.com

I grew up eating renditions of this recipe. Every couple of years, as I got older, the recipe’s identity evolved from crazy plain to what you see now. I guess you could say I went from super picky, pain in the ass eater to normal human and this recipe was along for the ride during that entire journey.

When I was a teeny kid, my mother would make picadillo and it’d simply be fried diced potato with ground beef over rice. (I hated raisins, boiled eggs and olives…and tomatoes.)

During my preteen years, I warmed up to boiled eggs so that was added, along with the tomato base that is so well known in picadillo and honestly essential.

In my late teen years, I became ok with the addition of olives. But it wasn’t until my twenties when I fully embraced the raisins, which now I think are crucial.

The version you see is what my adult self LOVES. And it’s probably the closest to the authentic original that is so popular in Cuban restaurants.

Picadillo | www.acozykitchen.com [click to continue…]

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